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CILC Co-Director Afra Afsharipour Serves as Visiting Scholar at National Chiao-Tung University in Taiwan

CILC Co-Director Afra Afsharipour Serves as Visiting Scholar at National Chiao-Tung University in Taiwan

CILC Co-Director and UC Davis Law Professor Afra Afsharipour recently to returned to campus after serving as a visiting scholar at National Chiao-Tung University, Taiwan earlier this month. She discusses her time there in her latest post on UC Davis Law School’s Faculty Blog. Her post can be found here: http://facultyblog.law.ucdavis.edu/post/serving-as-visiting-scholar-at-national-chiao-tung-university-in-taiwan.aspx

2015-2016 Annual Newsletter

2015-2016 Annual Newsletter

International and comparative law continues to thrive at UC Davis School of Law. The California International Law Center is thrilled to share our 2015-2016 Annual Newsletter highlighting an outstanding year of scholarship, special guests, and academic accomplishment.

The newsletter is below. Click the image to expand it into a slideshow or scroll down and select the arrows to navigate the pages.

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Professor Chander Speaks at Council on Foreign Relations Roundtable

Professor Chander Speaks at Council on Foreign Relations Roundtable

March 10, 2016

Professor Anupam Chander spoke at a Council on Foreign Relations roundtable on “The End of the Internet?” in San Francisco on February 25. The event was moderated by Peter Schwartz, Senior Vice President, Global Government Relations and Strategic Planning at Salesforce.com. Gordon Goldstein, Managing Director of the Silver Lake Group, led the discussion along with Professor Chander.

The roundtable brought together leaders from government and business to discuss threats to the open and global Internet.

Professor Chander, Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law at UC Davis School of Law, is a leading scholar of international economic law and cyberlaw. He is the author of The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World in Commerce, published in 2013 by Yale University Press. His scholarly papers can be accessed via his Social Science Research Network author page.

Professor Bennoune Presents First Report as Special Rapporteur to the United Nations

Professor Bennoune Presents First Report as Special Rapporteur to the United Nations

March 10, 2016

Professor Karima Bennoune presented her first report as Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights to the United Nations Human Rights Council on March 10, focusing on the intentional destruction of cultural heritage as a violation of human rights. Her presentation drew coverage from media including Voice of America and was broadcast on UN Web TV.

After reiterating key commitments and priorities, including the universality of human rights and cultural diversity, Bennoune’s report goes on to highlight emerging areas of concern that she intends to focus on as Rapporteur, including the intentional destruction of cultural heritage, as exemplified by the demolitions of the Baalshamin Temple and the Temple of Bel in Palmyra in 2015.

In the report, she frames the intentional destruction of cultural heritage as a human rights issue and calls on the international community to take a human rights approach to its defense.  She urges the universal ratification and good faith implementation of international treaties protecting cultural heritage.  Recalling the slain Syrian archaeologist Khaled al-Asaad, she exhorts the international community to do more to support at-risk cultural heritage professionals around the world.

Bennoune further states her intention to produce a “produce a body of work on diverse forms of fundamentalism and extremism, which have now reached devastating proportions in many regions of the world and have had grave repercussions on cultural rights, resulting e.g. in widespread attacks on art and artists, on schools, on curricula, on women, on cultural practices and heritage and on freedom of thought, conscience, and religion.” The report also touches on issues including the protection of cultural rights of refugees, the cultural rights of children, gender discrimination, the need to safeguard education, and the influence of new technologies on the ability of individuals and groups to exercise cultural rights.

The full text of the report and a UN Web TV video of Professor Bennoune’s presentation are available via the links below.

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. She recently was awarded the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for her book Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight against Muslim Fundamentalism, now available in paperback from W.W. Norton & Company. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

Report of the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights

UN Web TV

Voice of America

Professor Bennoune Speaks at High-Level United Nations Event

Professor Bennoune Speaks at High-Level United Nations Event

March 4, 2016

Professor Karima Bennoune spoke at “Destruction of Cultural Heritage: Contextualizing the human rights aspect with a view to prevention or mitigation,” an event sponsored by the Permanent Missions of Brazil, Cyprus, Ethiopia, Greece, Iraq, Ireland, Poland, Serbia, and Switzerland to the United Nations and the Geneva Academy. Held on February 29 at the UN Office in Geneva, the event included remarks by Yury Fedotov, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Alexandros M. Zenon, Deputy Foreign Minister of Cyprus, Iaonnis Amanatidis, Deputy Foreign Minister of Greece, and Kristin Hausler, Dorset Senior Research Fellow in Public International Law.

The event, held on the opening day of the 31st session of the United Nations Human Rights Council, was attended by diplomats and Non-Governmental Organizations from many countries.  Professor Bennoune discussed the intentional destruction of cultural heritage as a human rights issue, which is the theme of her first report as UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.  In particular, she called for support of at-risk cultural heritage professionals. Remembering fallen Syrian archaeologist Khaled al-Asaad, she urged that “we must not wait to rally to the cause of at-risk cultural heritage defenders until we are mourning their deaths.”

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

Professor Chander Speaks at Berkeley International Economy Roundtable

Professor Chander Speaks at Berkeley International Economy Roundtable

February 19, 2016

On February 12, Professor Anupam Chander participated in the Berkeley International Economy Roundtable (BRIE) discussions on the platform economy and Industry 4.0.  The meeting, which took place at the Claremont Hotel, brought together individuals with interest in public policy related to technology from across Europe and the United States.

Professor Chander spoke on the regulation of the platform economy, building on his comparative work comparing the regulation of Silicon Valley with the regulations of Internet enterprises in Europe, Japan, and South Korea.  Included in his talk were many of the ideas he explored in his paper “How Law Made Silicon Valley.”

Professor Chander, a Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law at UC Davis School of Law, is a leading scholar of international economic law and cyberlaw. He is the author of The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World in Commerce, published in 2013 by Yale University Press. His scholarly papers can be accessed via his Social Science Research Network author page.

Professor Bennoune Honored by International Action Network for Gender Equity & Law

Professor Bennoune Honored by International Action Network for Gender Equity & Law

February 12, 2016

Professor Karima Bennoune is being honored by the International Action Network for Gender Equity & Law (IANGEL) with the Rights and Leadership Award for 2016.  The award celebrates Professor Bennoune’s lifelong commitment to women’s human rights, her work in improving the understanding of fundamentalist ideologies, her support for change agents working to lay a foundation for long-term peace, and related efforts.

Professor Bennoune has been invited to receive the award and to deliver the keynote address at the IANGEL 3rd Anniversary Celebration in San Francisco on April 12. More information on the event, including how to purchase tickets, may be accessed via the link below.

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. She recently was awarded the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for her book Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight against Muslim Fundamentalism, now available in paperback from W.W. Norton & Company. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

IANGEL

United Nations Releases Professor Bennoune’s Statement on Forced Evictions in Pakistan

United Nations Releases Professor Bennoune’s Statement on Forced Evictions in Pakistan

January 28, 2016

Acting in her capacity as the United Nations Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights, Professor Karima Bennoune issued a statement on the Pakistani government’s forced evictions of residents in the path of construction work on the Orange metro line in Lahore.

“The project passes through the historic center of Lahore, threatening pre-partition buildings, minority places of worship, historic tombs and shrines, and great gardens, many of which are registered protected heritage sites,” Bennoune said in a January 25 UN news release. “These are of importance not only to local people and the entire cultural landscape of Lahore but are of national significance for the history and cultural heritage of Pakistan.”

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

UN News release

 

Professor Pruitt Speaks on Rwandan Genocide at Texas Christian University

Professor Pruitt Speaks on Rwandan Genocide at Texas Christian University

January 28, 2016

Professor Lisa R. Pruitt spoke on the Rwandan genocide at Texas Christian University as part of the Center for International Studies Frost Foundation Lectureship on January 21. Speaking with Professor Pruitt were Sara Darehshori, senior counsel for Human Rights Watch, and Ambassador Pierre Prosper, partner for Arent Fox. The topic was “Cultivating Global Citizenship.”

Professor Pruitt also attended a TCU screening of The Uncondemned, a documentary that recounts the 1997 trial of Jean-Paul Akayesu, a Rwandan mayor who was convicted of nine counts of genocide and crimes against humanity. (Dareshori and Proper, who spoke at the January 21 event, were the attorneys who tried the Akayesu case.) Pruitt appears in the film, which includes an account of how, as a PhD student and gender consultant to the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in 1996, she compiled a report on mass sexual violence during the Rwandan genocide that ultimately became the “smoking gun” in the successful prosecution of Akayesu.

Lisa R. Pruitt is a professor at UC Davis School of Law whose recent scholarship explores the legal relevance of rural spatiality, including how it inflects dimensions of gender, race, and ethnicity.  Pruitt’s work also considers rural-urban difference in transnational and international contexts.

Frost Foundation Lectureship

Professor Biagioli Gives Keynote Lecture at Venice International University Conference

Professor Biagioli Gives Keynote Lecture at Venice International University Conference

January 14, 2016

Professor Mario Biagioli delivered the keynote address for Venice International University’s International PhD Academy on January 8.  Professor Biagioli’s talk was titled “Beyond Pastures: Knowledge Commons v. Natural Commons.”

Professor Biagioli, an internationally renowned expert in the fields of Intellectual Property and the History of Copyright, is the founding Director of the Center for Innovation Studies at UC Davis.

Venice International University’s International PhD Academy