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CONFERENCE: An Open Digital South | May 25-26 at King Hall

CONFERENCE: An Open Digital South | May 25-26 at King Hall

An Open Digital South: Risks and Rewards

Thursday, May 25, 2017 – Friday, May 26, 2017 |  Location: UC Davis School of Law (King Hall) | Sponsored by Innovating Communication in Scholarship
Register here: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/an-open-digital-south-risks-and-rewards-registration-33599812945

This conference explores the promises and risks of openness in scholarship in relationship to the Global South. Research and scholarship are increasingly adopting ‘open’ models of practice and sharing, as open access publications, open data, and open source software. This openness supports improved research reusability, reproducibility, and visibility. Scholarly ‘openness’ is intended to facilitate the free flow of information, to address barriers to equitable access, and to foster global intellectual conversations. Do attempts at promoting openness in scholarship create new forms of exclusion or hierarchy in various regions of the world? How are Southern scholars and publishers’ experiences with open access and open data taken into account within conversations on developing standards and models for ‘open’ scholarship in the Global North? Are there unanticipated opportunities or risks created through the implementation of models for open data, open software, or open access to research?

The event is free and open to the public. If you can’t physically make it, you can watch it on livestream from the comfort of your home. To get information on our simultaneous livestream, register at https://livestream.com/UCDavis/OpenDigitalSouth2017 to receive details as soon as they are available.

Schedule 

DAY 1: FRAMING SCIENTIFIC OPENNESS & PUBLISHING

9:00-9:30 || Registration, Breakfast

9:30-10:00 || Welcoming Remarks, Dean Elizabeth Spiller

10:00-11:00 || Kavita Phillip, UC Irvine, Keynote, “A dose of rum and a few rupees”: Revisiting the Romance of the Commons

11:00-12:30 || Situating Open Access in the Global South

Open Access can and has been approached and implemented in many ways to serve its diverse constituencies. Similarly, participation in Open Access scholarship takes many forms, whether in readers’ use, re-use, and engagement, or in authors’ publication and sharing. How are multiple models of OA being considered to reflect the different needs of open access’ participants, particularly in the global south? When and how do open policies and practices improve global participation in both the production and consumption of open scholarship? How, for instance, does the adoption of APC-funded open access affect authors around the globe?

  • Laura Czerniewicz, UCT, South Africa
  • Arianna Becerril, Redalyc
  • Conrad Omonhinmin, Covenant University
  • Solange Santos, SciELO
  • Jingfeng Xia, East Stroudsberg University

12:30-1:30 || Lunch

1:30-3:00 || What is Predatory Publishing? Questioning the Critique of Open Access Journals

To critics of OA journals whose APC-based business model are seen as evidence of dubious publishing ethics, the Global South provides something of a “perfect storm,” a scenario in which unscrupulous publishers prey on practitioners likely to be enticed by the low APC charged by these OA journals or the lack of rigorous peer review. Casting the Global South as the perfect prey is, we believe, part of a broader trend within the discourse of global OA publishing. As activists, watchdogs, and research integrity experts take the central stage of OA debates, there has been increasing use of inflammatory predator-prey language, and of moralizing critiques of current publishing scenarios. To some extent, this powerful rhetoric has foreclosed empirical questions about academic and publishing markets, and about past, ongoing, and novel North-South hierarchies that these markets derive from and now sustain. This panel wants to replace moralizing narratives with evidence-based discussions into the realities of so-called “predatory journals,” ask how predatory these journals really are, who exactly are their prey and beneficiaries and, more broadly, what the future of OA publishing in the Global South could and should be.

  • Trish Groves, BMJ
  • Kishore Vattikoti, OMICS
  • Jingfeng Xia, East Stroudsberg University
  • Matthew Hodgkinson, Hindawi

3:15-4:45 || Researcher Experiences

Individual researchers experience the limitations and possibilities of open research practices on a day-to-day basis. At Davis our research community reflects the global nature of scholarship, with many researchers hailing from the Global South. The diversity of experiences, perspectives, and knowledges enriches the university through expanding possibilities for innovation and research. How have international scholars’ open practices been shaped by working and studying at institutions in the Global North? This panel will serve as a conversation between local researchers on their experiences with open practices and how these are inflected or informed by their work in both the Global South and North.

  • Carlos Andrés Barragan UC Davis, Science & Technology Studies
  • Luis Felipe Murillo CNAM/LISE, Anthropology
  • Noopur Raval, UC Irvine, Informatics
  • Jie Zheng, UC Davis, Medicine

5:00|| Reception

DAY 2: DATA, METADATA, & THINGS

9:45-10:45 || Ruth Okediji, University of Minnesota, Keynote, The Genealogy of Knowledge: Constructing the Public Domain for New Intellectual Property Assets

10:45-11:00 || Break

11:00-12:30 || Risks and Opportunities in Digital Openness Beyond the Journal, Part 1: Open Objects and Digital Things

Technological innovations have made it much easier and cheaper to convert real world entities into digital representations (e.g., 3D scans, genome sequencing, etc). This digitalization, and the ease of sharing that information has revolutionized the study and exploitation of these objects. One use of this data is that it allows people to synthesize these entities from the data (e.g., 3D printing, synthetic biology). Such synthesis comes with both benefits (e.g., rapid and cheap dissemination) and risks (e.g., biopiracy, inaccurate representation of the original objects). This panel asks about these risks and benefits in relation to the Global South.

  • Margo Bagley, UVA Law
  • Aaron Fox, Columbia
  • Maurizio Forte, Duke

12:30-1:30 || Lunch

1:30-3:00 || Risks and Opportunities in Digital Openness Beyond the Journal, Part 2: Open Digital Information

While open data offers scholars serious benefits such as transparency, sharing and pooling of knowledge, there are some risks involved, some well appreciated, some less so. The best example comes from medical research, where extensive protocols are in place (though not always used) for protecting privacy of data. Less appreciated are risks in other areas. For example, poachers of animals and plants utilize scientific publications to find and capture newly discovered or rare species. Similarly, archaeological information can be used by looters. This panel explores issues which blanket policies on openness do not address and considers how policies on openness could learn from fields such as anthropology and medicine which have experience protecting privacy. What role do/should journals play in the “hiding” of such information? How have different disciplines developed tools and practices to deal with issues of privacy, confidentiality, and sharing information? How do the practices for protecting information affect research and knowledge sharing?

  • James Leach, CNRS
  • Kim Fortun, RPI
  • Pranesh Prakash, Centre for Internet and Society
Professor Dodge Files Amicus Brief with U.S. Supreme Court

Professor Dodge Files Amicus Brief with U.S. Supreme Court

Prof. Dodge by CILC BannerProfessor Dodge recently filed an Amicus Brief with the U.S. Supreme Court in relation to the case Animal Science Products, Inc. v. Hebei Welcome Pharmaceutical Co. Ltd. (No. 16-1220). The brief urges the Court to grant certiorari to review whether a court may abstain from exercising jurisdiction on a case-by-case basis as a matter of discretionary international comity, over an otherwise valid Sherman Antitrust Act claim.Professor Dodge has published an article about “International Comity in American Law” in Columbia Law Review and has publicly criticized the Second Circuit’s decision in Animal Science. Professor Dodge filed the brief with his Co-Reporter for the Restatement (Fourth) of Foreign Relations Law, Professor Paul B. Stephan of the University of Virginia School of Law.

Professor Dodge, Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law at UC Davis School of Law, is an influential international law scholar. He serves as a Co-Reporter for the American Law Institute’s Restatement (Fourth) of Foreign Relations Law: Jurisdiction and as a member of the State Department’s Advisory Committee on International Law. He is a co-author of the casebook Transnational Business Problems and a co-editor of International Law in the U.S. Supreme Court: Continuity and Change, which won the American Society of International Law’s 2012 certificate of merit. He has authored more than 50 other publications in books and law reviews.

 

News report originally featured on UC Davis School of Law News and Events.

CILC Co-Director Afra Afsharipour Serves as Visiting Scholar at National Chiao-Tung University in Taiwan

CILC Co-Director Afra Afsharipour Serves as Visiting Scholar at National Chiao-Tung University in Taiwan

CILC Co-Director and UC Davis Law Professor Afra Afsharipour recently to returned to campus after serving as a visiting scholar at National Chiao-Tung University, Taiwan earlier this month. She discusses her time there in her latest post on UC Davis Law School’s Faculty Blog. Her post can be found here: http://facultyblog.law.ucdavis.edu/post/serving-as-visiting-scholar-at-national-chiao-tung-university-in-taiwan.aspx

2015-2016 Annual Newsletter

2015-2016 Annual Newsletter

International and comparative law continues to thrive at UC Davis School of Law. The California International Law Center is thrilled to share our 2015-2016 Annual Newsletter highlighting an outstanding year of scholarship, special guests, and academic accomplishment.

The newsletter is below. Click the image to expand it into a slideshow or scroll down and select the arrows to navigate the pages.

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Professor Chander Speaks at Council on Foreign Relations Roundtable

Professor Chander Speaks at Council on Foreign Relations Roundtable

March 10, 2016

Professor Anupam Chander spoke at a Council on Foreign Relations roundtable on “The End of the Internet?” in San Francisco on February 25. The event was moderated by Peter Schwartz, Senior Vice President, Global Government Relations and Strategic Planning at Salesforce.com. Gordon Goldstein, Managing Director of the Silver Lake Group, led the discussion along with Professor Chander.

The roundtable brought together leaders from government and business to discuss threats to the open and global Internet.

Professor Chander, Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law at UC Davis School of Law, is a leading scholar of international economic law and cyberlaw. He is the author of The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World in Commerce, published in 2013 by Yale University Press. His scholarly papers can be accessed via his Social Science Research Network author page.

Professor Bennoune Presents First Report as Special Rapporteur to the United Nations

Professor Bennoune Presents First Report as Special Rapporteur to the United Nations

March 10, 2016

Professor Karima Bennoune presented her first report as Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights to the United Nations Human Rights Council on March 10, focusing on the intentional destruction of cultural heritage as a violation of human rights. Her presentation drew coverage from media including Voice of America and was broadcast on UN Web TV.

After reiterating key commitments and priorities, including the universality of human rights and cultural diversity, Bennoune’s report goes on to highlight emerging areas of concern that she intends to focus on as Rapporteur, including the intentional destruction of cultural heritage, as exemplified by the demolitions of the Baalshamin Temple and the Temple of Bel in Palmyra in 2015.

In the report, she frames the intentional destruction of cultural heritage as a human rights issue and calls on the international community to take a human rights approach to its defense.  She urges the universal ratification and good faith implementation of international treaties protecting cultural heritage.  Recalling the slain Syrian archaeologist Khaled al-Asaad, she exhorts the international community to do more to support at-risk cultural heritage professionals around the world.

Bennoune further states her intention to produce a “produce a body of work on diverse forms of fundamentalism and extremism, which have now reached devastating proportions in many regions of the world and have had grave repercussions on cultural rights, resulting e.g. in widespread attacks on art and artists, on schools, on curricula, on women, on cultural practices and heritage and on freedom of thought, conscience, and religion.” The report also touches on issues including the protection of cultural rights of refugees, the cultural rights of children, gender discrimination, the need to safeguard education, and the influence of new technologies on the ability of individuals and groups to exercise cultural rights.

The full text of the report and a UN Web TV video of Professor Bennoune’s presentation are available via the links below.

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. She recently was awarded the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for her book Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight against Muslim Fundamentalism, now available in paperback from W.W. Norton & Company. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

Report of the Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights

UN Web TV

Voice of America

Professor Bennoune Speaks at High-Level United Nations Event

Professor Bennoune Speaks at High-Level United Nations Event

March 4, 2016

Professor Karima Bennoune spoke at “Destruction of Cultural Heritage: Contextualizing the human rights aspect with a view to prevention or mitigation,” an event sponsored by the Permanent Missions of Brazil, Cyprus, Ethiopia, Greece, Iraq, Ireland, Poland, Serbia, and Switzerland to the United Nations and the Geneva Academy. Held on February 29 at the UN Office in Geneva, the event included remarks by Yury Fedotov, Executive Director of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Alexandros M. Zenon, Deputy Foreign Minister of Cyprus, Iaonnis Amanatidis, Deputy Foreign Minister of Greece, and Kristin Hausler, Dorset Senior Research Fellow in Public International Law.

The event, held on the opening day of the 31st session of the United Nations Human Rights Council, was attended by diplomats and Non-Governmental Organizations from many countries.  Professor Bennoune discussed the intentional destruction of cultural heritage as a human rights issue, which is the theme of her first report as UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.  In particular, she called for support of at-risk cultural heritage professionals. Remembering fallen Syrian archaeologist Khaled al-Asaad, she urged that “we must not wait to rally to the cause of at-risk cultural heritage defenders until we are mourning their deaths.”

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

Professor Chander Speaks at Berkeley International Economy Roundtable

Professor Chander Speaks at Berkeley International Economy Roundtable

February 19, 2016

On February 12, Professor Anupam Chander participated in the Berkeley International Economy Roundtable (BRIE) discussions on the platform economy and Industry 4.0.  The meeting, which took place at the Claremont Hotel, brought together individuals with interest in public policy related to technology from across Europe and the United States.

Professor Chander spoke on the regulation of the platform economy, building on his comparative work comparing the regulation of Silicon Valley with the regulations of Internet enterprises in Europe, Japan, and South Korea.  Included in his talk were many of the ideas he explored in his paper “How Law Made Silicon Valley.”

Professor Chander, a Martin Luther King, Jr. Professor of Law at UC Davis School of Law, is a leading scholar of international economic law and cyberlaw. He is the author of The Electronic Silk Road: How the Web Binds the World in Commerce, published in 2013 by Yale University Press. His scholarly papers can be accessed via his Social Science Research Network author page.

Professor Bennoune Honored by International Action Network for Gender Equity & Law

Professor Bennoune Honored by International Action Network for Gender Equity & Law

February 12, 2016

Professor Karima Bennoune is being honored by the International Action Network for Gender Equity & Law (IANGEL) with the Rights and Leadership Award for 2016.  The award celebrates Professor Bennoune’s lifelong commitment to women’s human rights, her work in improving the understanding of fundamentalist ideologies, her support for change agents working to lay a foundation for long-term peace, and related efforts.

Professor Bennoune has been invited to receive the award and to deliver the keynote address at the IANGEL 3rd Anniversary Celebration in San Francisco on April 12. More information on the event, including how to purchase tickets, may be accessed via the link below.

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. She recently was awarded the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for her book Your Fatwa Does Not Apply Here: Untold Stories from the Fight against Muslim Fundamentalism, now available in paperback from W.W. Norton & Company. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

IANGEL

United Nations Releases Professor Bennoune’s Statement on Forced Evictions in Pakistan

United Nations Releases Professor Bennoune’s Statement on Forced Evictions in Pakistan

January 28, 2016

Acting in her capacity as the United Nations Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights, Professor Karima Bennoune issued a statement on the Pakistani government’s forced evictions of residents in the path of construction work on the Orange metro line in Lahore.

“The project passes through the historic center of Lahore, threatening pre-partition buildings, minority places of worship, historic tombs and shrines, and great gardens, many of which are registered protected heritage sites,” Bennoune said in a January 25 UN news release. “These are of importance not only to local people and the entire cultural landscape of Lahore but are of national significance for the history and cultural heritage of Pakistan.”

Karima Bennoune is an author, lecturer, teacher, and international law scholar as well as the first Arab-American to be honored with the Derrick A. Bell Award from the Section on Minority Groups of the Association of American Law Schools. In October 2015, she was appointed UN Special Rapporteur in the field of cultural rights.

UN News release