PhD Candidate Daniel Grinberg: Tracking Movements—Aerial Surveillance, Social Activism, and the Freedom of Information Act

PhD Candidate Daniel Grinberg: Tracking Movements—Aerial Surveillance, Social Activism, and the Freedom of Information Act

Thursday, April 20, 2017 | Noon | King Hall, Room 1002 | Lunch Provided

As part of our Mellon Sawyer Foundation “Surveillance Democracies?” Lecture Series, this talk will use Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) disclosures to address the contemporary surveillance of activists in the United States. It will examine the chilling of free assembly, the tactical intensification of domestic security, the asymmetrical mobilities afforded to different social groups, and the selective dissemination and circulation of official knowledge. It will focus on the FBI’s aerial surveillance and recording of the 2015 Freddie Gray protests in Baltimore, and the 19 hours of video footage the agency publicly released through FOIA. Grinberg will argue that such footage provides compelling evidence of imperializing top-down visualities and develops the racialized logics that underlie the coordinated monitoring and management of groups.

Daniel Grinberg is a PhD candidate in the Department of Film and Media Studies at the University of California, Santa Barbara. His scholarship focuses on the interrelations of surveillance records, documentary film, and Freedom of Information Act disclosures, and how these media forms can help us re-view contemporary war and security practices. He has also studied topics such as terror watchlists, virtual reality simulations, predictive security algorithms, and the militainment network of the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base. His writing has appeared in publications such as Studies in Documentary Film, Jump Cut, and InMedia and is forthcoming in the Journal of War and Culture Studies, Spectator, and Surveillance & Society. He is also the co-editor of the “Surveillance States” issue of Media Fields Journal and the co-organizer of the “War, Security, and Digital Media” 2017-2018 UCHRI Graduate Working Group.