Visibility, Reciprocity, and Resistance: Policing and Reciprocal Surveillance

Visibility, Reciprocity, and Resistance: Policing and Reciprocal Surveillance

Wednesday, September 24, 2014 | King Hall Room 1002 | 12:00 PM

Bryce Newell ’10 | University of Washington Information School

Bryce Newell is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Washington Information School, a researcher with the UW Tech Policy Lab, and a former Google Policy Fellow. A graduate of UC Davis School of Law, he is also a member of the California State Bar (inactive), and a documentary filmmaker. His conducts theoretical and empirical research in the areas of information law, policy, and ethics, with a focus on the legal and social implications of surveillance and counter-surveillance in modern society. In this talk, Bryce will present findings from on-going research that explores the intersections between police use of wearable cameras, the rights of citizens to record encounters with police officers, and the role of public access to government surveillance databases as a form of reciprocal surveillance. To address these issues, he is utilizing doctrinal legal analysis, interviews, field observation, freedom of information requests, spatial data analysis and visualization of geospatial automated license plate recognition (ALPR) databases, and philosophical argumentation, to better understand the implications of police and citizens “crossing lenses” in public spaces